Posts Tagged: 2013

Happy Holidays…and say hello to our newest coblogger!

Happy Holidays…and say hello to our newest coblogger!

Hope you all are having a lovely holiday season! Last Friday, Kate and Tonya and I took a little break from the hustle and bustle as we met up for a Midnight Garden Christmas Tea, where there was much bookish discussion and merriment. Over tiny sandwiches and pastries and tea, we chatted about the books we’re currently reading as a harpist played in the background. The hand-painted china was SO pretty (Kate said it was like fairy china) and I dearly wanted to take the cunning little silver spoons home. We also exchanged some presents. Do you give bookish gifts? I picked special ones for each of my ladies. I got Kate Tell the Wolves I’m Home because I want to make her cry; I got K Soulless because she couldn’t be with us for our tea, so she can enjoy the werewolves having tea with Victorian ladies instead; and… Read more »

Divider

Dickens Christmas Séance: event recap

Dickens Christmas Séance: event recap

I love doing very Christmassy types of things, but I never thought I’d be attending a Victorian literary séance. But when I saw the event hosted by the Pomona Historical Society and Pomona Library pop up on Facebook, I just couldn’t resist! I’m fascinated by the Victorians’ obsession with death and mysticism, particularly after reading Affinity and In the Shadow of the Blackbirds, and of course A Christmas Carol puts a whole new spin on ghosts and the holiday season. Two things you should know about me: 1. I absolutely believe in ghosts. 2. But I’m also a skeptic and well aware that a large percentage of supernatural phenomena are most likely hoaxes. Mr. Darling and I signed up for this as a lark with more intellectual curiosity than anything else, so it wasn’t until we were sitting in the library enjoying cookies and punch that it occurred to me… Read more »

Divider

Fortune’s Pawn: review

Fortune’s Pawn: review

When Fortune’s Pawn landed on my doorstep I regarded it with the usual skepticism. (I know, I’m terrible.) But sometimes taking a chance on something you’ve never heard of pays off in a big way, because I love, love, loved this book! It’s science fiction written like urban fantasy–while I may catch some flack for that description, what I really mean by that is that it’s a well-plotted, complex futuristic story, but it zips along with snappy dialogue and snark more commonly found in UF. And as much as a badass as Devi is, there’s also a definite focus on her love life as well. If you’re a fan of scifi, here are just a few things I’ve come up with to persuade you to give this series a chance. 5 Reasons to Read Fortune’s Pawn Devi is really IS like Ripley in Aliens. Marketing copy often makes me laugh… Read more »

Divider

My Lunch with Marie Lu + Champion Giveaway

My Lunch with Marie Lu + Champion Giveaway

This past weekend I got to do something really cool.  Like, really, really, really cool.  I was invited by Penguin Teen, along with the lovely Gillian of Writer of Wrongs, to have lunch with Marie Lu before her signing at Mysterious Galaxy Bookstore.  The Legend Trilogy is one of my favorite YA series from the past few years, so I was really excited, but also kind of nervous and intimidated. We braved the freezing weather (55 degrees) and perilous driving conditions (some rain) to meet up in Redondo Beach and chat over catfish and shrimp.  I was, as I said, nervous, so I arrived over half an hour early (if I hadn’t spilled coffee on myself I’d have been even earlier) and sat in my car texting my sisters.  Gillian was there early, too, so we were standing together talking about how freakishly cold our hands were when Marie strolled… Read more »

Divider

Ink is Thicker Than Water: review

Ink is Thicker Than Water: review

With her second novel in a year (busy girl!), Amy Spalding delivers on the expectations she set with her debut,  The Reece Malcolm List—which, you might recall, I adored. In Ink is Thicker than Water, Spalding succeeds again in creating teenage characters that feel honest and authentic. They sound like teenagers, they think like teenagers, and their problems are those that real teenagers have to navigate in their daily lives. There’s something infinitely relatable about her character that I find nostalgic; her books remind me what it like to be a teenager. I appreciated that the central conflict focused on Kellie’s family dynamics. While Kellie’s family is anything but the usual–straight-laced lawyerly dad whose approval she can never quite earn, hippie tattoo-shop-owning mother and stepfather, beautiful brainiac adopted sister–their problems are. Her sister, her confidante and parter, growing up and finding an identity outside of her role in their family…. Read more »

Divider

The Promise of Amazing: review

The Promise of Amazing: review

Look at that cover! Oh, how I want to join those two fresh-faced teenagers in their tiny little love bubble.  I want to giggle and be generally adorable with them.  I want him to call her “short stuff” and her to tease him about his awkward lankiness and the fact that he’s ugly in the same way as Paul Dano, and then I want to squee as they touch their frosty noses together. And the premise–girl working in her family’s Medieval Times-style banquet hall falls in love with a boy after saving his life in a ridiculous way–is a lot of fun.  I wanted so badly to love this book.  It really does (I’m so sorry please forgive me) promise to be amazing. That’s the problem with titles, isn’t it?  A few years ago, my husband wrote for a show called The Forgotten, and the day he got the job… Read more »

Divider

Rebel Spring (Falling Kingdoms #2): review

Rebel Spring (Falling Kingdoms #2): review

Rebel Spring is the much anticipated second installment in Morgan Rhodes’ Falling Kingdoms series. Right where we left off: Princess Cleo’s kingdom has been conquered, King Gaius has won. Jonas is the leader of a rebel group. Prince Magnus is at his father’s side and Princess Lucia is trapped in her magically-induced slumber. As Rhodes made clear in Falling Kingdoms, this is not a fantasy novel of war, power, and magic sugar-coated for its young readers. She doesn’t skip over brutality — in fact, she seems to relish in it. Her world truthfully depicts the heinous and cruel acts of battle…and in turn, its consequences. The good thing: this is highly readable. It’s an easy story to get into and it has enough grit to suck you in. It’s a pretty thick book but pages fly and the story takes you for a ride. The characters are also mostly likeable…. Read more »

Divider