Genre: science fiction

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Fortune’s Pawn: review

Fortune’s Pawn: review

When Fortune’s Pawn landed on my doorstep I regarded it with the usual skepticism. (I know, I’m terrible.) But sometimes taking a chance on something you’ve never heard of pays off in a big way, because I love, love, loved this book! It’s science fiction written like urban fantasy–while I may catch some flack for that description, what I really mean by that is that it’s a well-plotted, complex futuristic story, but it zips along with snappy dialogue and snark more commonly found in UF. And as much as a badass as Devi is, there’s also a definite focus on her love life as well. If you’re a fan of scifi, here are just a few things I’ve come up with to persuade you to give this series a chance. 5 Reasons to Read Fortune’s Pawn Devi is really IS like Ripley in Aliens. Marketing copy often makes me laugh… Read more »

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These Broken Stars: review

These Broken Stars: review

I’ve heard this book described as Titanic in space, and while I suppose that is technically pretty accurate, it really only applies to the first 10% of the story, at which point the crash occurs.  From then on, it’s about two brilliant young people from opposite backgrounds who have to learn to work together to survive alone, marooned on a strange planet that seems to be haunted by the ghosts of their ship’s dead. Lilac is the only child of the wealthiest man in the universe (Which is, by the way, an amount of money that has no comparison in our world.  She’s not Paris Hilton-level rich; her father runs a corporation that essentially controls what goes on on almost every planet.  And he’s single.)  The two of them have been extremely close (not in a creepy way) since the death of her mother, and he’s taught her a great… Read more »

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Unfed: review

Unfed: review

In Undead, fifteen-year-old Bobby Brook and her mother moved back to Scotland from the US, where they’d lived for six years, following the death of Bobby’s father. Before the school year started, Bobby’s mother insisted that she go on a class trip to a ski lodge.  While Bobby was out in the wilds of Scotland with her classmates, there was a zombie outbreak, and all but a handful of the students fell victim to it.  The survivors—Smitty (the bad boy), Pete (the nerd), and Alice (the mean girl)—fought their way through a countryside teeming with zombies, forming a sort of weird, dysfunctional family, the center of which was Bobby and Smitty’s friendship/fledgling romance When last we saw Bobby and her friends, they were in a school bus, fleeing the disgusting zombie hordes, and that’s where we pick up at the beginning of Unfed: We’re in a school bus.  Which is… Read more »

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Reboot: review

Reboot: review

As most of you probably know, Wendy is our resident zombie / horror lover, while I’m more likely to be found cowering under the blankets because I saw thirty seconds of a horror movie trailer. Three hours ago. So when I read the summary for Reboot by Amy Tintera, I thought, “sentient zombies? I can totally handle that.” And I was half right. It wasn’t scary at all, but I don’t think my initial assessment was all that accurate. Reboots aren’t zombie-like in the least. Well. At least, not normally. When the KDH virus swept through the population, people began dropping like flies. Except… they didn’t stay dead. Their bodies rebooted (heh, get it?) after death, coming back stronger, faster, healthier–a more perfect version of their previous selves. And, naturally, the government used this to their advantage, rounding up all the Reboots and training them to be super soldiers, keeping… Read more »

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Arclight: review

Arclight: review

A harrowing sci-fi thriller about a teen who’s survived horrors but lost her memory, for fans of Veronica Roth, Stephen King, and Justin Cronin. When I read that description, I actually groaned. Comparing anything to those authors is just as bad as every new dystopian being coined the next Hunger Games; it nearly always sets up the reader for disappointment. What could possibly live up to those standards? Well, Arclight by Josin McQuein kind of… does. It’s got the dystopian feel of Divergent, the King creep-factor, and a serving of government experiment gone horribly wrong courtesy of Cronin. Marina woke up in the Arclight hospital, with no memory of how she got there. All she knows is what she’s been told: they found her in the Grey, hiding from the Fades, and brought her back to the compound. She doesn’t know who she is, or where she came from before that–no… Read more »

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Scarlet: review & giveaway

Scarlet: review & giveaway

I read the first in the Lunar Chronicles, Cinder, just last week, and was enamored with Marissa Meyer’s imaginative and wholly original take on the Cinderella fairy tale (seriously, who gets sci-fi/fantasy with cyborgs and aliens and magic powers from that? SOMEONE AWESOME, obviously), and very much enjoyed the depth and humor she infused into the characters. But, there was still something missing for me. Some indefinable piece that could bump it up from, “wow, this is really great” to, “TELL ME MORE. IMMEDIATELY.” I’m pleased to tell you, my friends, Scarlet is that missing piece . With its higher stakes, intense action, and one hell of a big, (so hot it might be) bad (for your heart) Wolf, I couldn’t turn the pages fast enough. The sequel picks up right where Cinder left off, but from Scarlet’s point of view. She, as you might have imagined, is a red-headed,… Read more »

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