Posts Categorized: Sangu Mandanna

Bookish Wrapping Ideas + Tips!

Bookish Wrapping Ideas + Tips!

Are you finished with your holiday wrapping? I bet you’ve been too busy reading, my little chickadees! ;) I always give a lot of book presents, and this year is no exception. Inspired by Book Riot’s post on cute ways to wrap book presents, I thought I’d share a few bookish present photos of my own! I’m a big believer in packaging being an important part of the gifting experience, so I love making presents feel special. And few gifts are more meaningful than a book you’ve chosen especially for a friend. Here are some ideas from presents I’ve sent that might be useful as you head into the weekend. Some wrapping tips are listed below, too. Sequin ribbon + jingle bell and hand-glittered pine cone + vintage velvet ribbon (contains A Monster Calls and Liesl & Po) handmade pipe cleaner present toppers paper printed from Reprodepo’s Pattern Book +… Read more »

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Sangu Mandanna Talks About Frankenstein…and Love

Sangu Mandanna Talks About Frankenstein…and Love

As a reader, every once in awhile you come across a book that strikes a chord deep inside you. I was intrigued by the idea behind The Lost Girl, in which a young female clone must move to India to lead a whole new life, but I never expected to be as moved by the book as I was.  The lovely author Sangu Mandanna stops by The Midnight Garden today to share how an unlikely classic–and her own loss–helped inspire a brilliant young adult novel that is already garnering rave reviews. ~ Wendy Sangu Mandanna Guest Post I wrote a book about death. But, you know, I think it’s really about love. It’s about the kinds of things people will do to keep hold of the ones they love. Sometimes that means sacrificing everything to be with someone you’re not supposed to be with. And sometimes that means signing up… Read more »

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The Lost Girl: review

The Lost Girl: review

The Lost Girlby Sangu Mandanna “Can we be certain of anyone’s soul, human or otherwise?” Fiction is often most meaningful when it explores questions we find too disturbing to ask in the everyday world. Through one girl’s struggle to claim her own identity, The Lost Girl addresses some fascinating ethical questions, all the while presenting a measured, powerful essay on the value of human life. Fifteen-year-old Eva lives, sleeps, and breathes someone else’s existence. As an echo, a carbon copy of a girl halfway across the world, she learns everything that Amarra learns and is even nearly forced to suffer the same physical injuries as her other. There have been various books that explore cloning, but what’s so unusual about this one is the psychological element, since it’s not just Eva’s organs that are being harvested, it’s her entire entity and identity. One of the things I liked best about… Read more »

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