Posts Categorized: male narrator

Wonders of the Invisible World: Review

Wonders of the Invisible World: Review

I seem to have an affinity for those books which are magical and strange and not entirely definable. Sitting down to the write this review, it occurs to me how difficult it is to describe this book. I can tell you what it’s about, but to describe the experience of reading it almost makes me feel like I’ve had a spell cast on me myself. There is a palpable sense of unreality throughout as Aidan journeys to unravel the mysteries of himself and his family. Aidan can’t remember entire swaths of his life and he doesn’t even realize it. He drifts along as in a fog, feeling barely there at all. Until the day an old friend comes back into his life and lost memories begin to shake themselves loose from their bindings. But who bound Aidan’s memories, and why? You have to tell your story true, and not everyone… Read more »

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The Rest of Us Just Live Here: Review

The Rest of Us Just Live Here: Review

It finally happened. A book was special enough, funny enough, heartfelt enough, and just downright good enough to break the spell. My awful slump might be officially over; and it’s all thanks to Patrick Ness’ sly, hilarious, wry, and absolutely on point observations on growing up and what it means to move on. What is this book even about? It’s hard to pigeonhole this one into a genre! It’s sort of fantasy, sort of paranormal, sort of sci-fi…but it’s not really any of those things. There are definite supernatural happenings going on in the background. But this is very purposefully a book that is not about those happenings. The point is that there are regular, ordinary (well,for the most part) citizens who are just trying to continue going about their lives, even in the midst of very obvious supernatural turmoil. This book is about the ordinary people who just keep… Read more »

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Red Rising: Review

Red Rising: Review

Oh, Red Rising. Where do I even start with you? There were many “What in the world?!?” moments throughout this reading (that’s a good thing). This is essentially “Dystopian, eugenic, Capture the Flag on Mars”. For real. I did a lot of creepy, evil smiling throughout. What can I say? This book served to further chill the cockles of my cold, dark heart, and I just loved it for that. This is a story for readers who, like me, are fascinated by these questions: What happens when your enemy becomes your friend? What happens when you become your enemy? I’ve kept this as free of plot points as possible. The less you know about what is going on and what is going to happen the better. I wouldn’t want to deny you a single one of those jaw dropping moments. I am absolutely horrified by the world of Red Rising… Read more »

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The Dream Thieves: review

The Dream Thieves: review

Title:The Dream Thieves (Raven Cycle #2)Author:Maggie StiefvaterRating: 5 out of 5 starsRelease Date: September 17th, 2013Publisher:ScholasticAge Group: YASource: ARC provided by the publisher This is the fantastical story of a boy tormented by nightmares that literally–literally!–become real. Set shortly after the events of The Raven Boys, the students of Aglionby Academy are still on the hunt for a legendary sleeping Welsh king. This time, while we continue to get perspectives from multiple POVs, the story primarily focuses on Ronan Lynch, a troubled and angry 17-year-old who pulls dark objects out of his dreams. But when ley lines running through their sleepy town are awakened, incredible power is unleashed, and none of the boys are prepared for the ordeal that awaits them. I liked The Raven Boys so much that I was nervous going into this one–but I think this book actually surpasses its predecessor, in no small part because of… Read more »

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Mini Reviews: Risk-Takers Edition

Mini Reviews: Risk-Takers Edition

Today we’re featuring two debuts that challenge YA fans in different ways! I thought these were both amazing, and I hope they find an audience in readers who enjoy books that don’t necessarily conform to conventional genre models. Title: Charm & StrangeAuthor:Stephanie KuehnRating: 4 out of 5 starsRelease Date:June 11, 2013Publisher:St. Martins PressAge Group: YASource: finished copy from the publisher Charm & Strange by Stephanie Kuehn is indeed very, very strange. It is a wild, abstract beast that demands terrible pity–yet it’s written with such unerring discipline that it never becomes unruly or mundane. I wasn’t sure what to expect going into this novel, but as it turns out, it’s one of those books where it’s better not to know too much about the story anyway. Andrew Winston Winters, or “Win,” has arrived at a new school in Vermont, where he won’t let anyone get too close. But Win is… Read more »

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Coda: review

Coda: review

There are some people in the world to whom music is as vital as oxygen. To those–me, and certainly Emma Trevayne, the author of Coda–music has the ability to heighten emotions, to heal, to soothe, to enrige, and excite. To us, music is as potent as any drug, and almost as addicting. To Anthem, and the rest of the citizens in The Web, there is no almost. Music is quite literally a drug, one as addicting as any narcotic. And just as dangerous. In Anthem’s post-war world on the island of Manhattan, the Corp–the nameless, faceless, despotic government–controls everyone through music specially encoded to be as addicting, and mood-altering as possible. It keeps the citizens passive, keeps them dependent–and ensures they don’t live long enough to have time to do anything but survive. But Anthem has a secret. He and four others meet secretly once a week to play music… Read more »

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