Posts Categorized: K.

Discussion: Disappointing Endings

Discussion: Disappointing Endings

Have you ever been disappointed by a book or a series’ ending? Have you ever been left dumbfounded and flabbergasted by a book’s finale? Perhaps even angry, or grieving or upset? Of course, you have. We all have those endings that we like to pretend never happened. We all have those series that we pretend were standalones…or standalones we pretend were never written. This month, we’ve chosen to discuss such books. Painful as it is, we will rehash all these disappointing endings and bitter feelings. Why? Because we are humans and we love to vent when overcome with intense emotions. So join us but at your own risk…there will, obviously, be major spoilers. Here we go… ~K. K.’s Disappointing Endings The Gemma Doyle trilogy by Libba Bray was one of my earliest introductions into Young Adult and I enjoyed it immensely…even to this day, it stands as one of my most favourite… Read more »

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The Nethergrim: review

The Nethergrim: review

The Nethergrim is an enjoyable middle-grade fantasy by first time author Matthew Jobin. It tells of the adventure of three outsiders: Edmund, the son of an innkeeper, who spends what little money he saves on books of spells, legends, and histories; Katherine, the daughter and only child of the Lord’s master of horses, who should be learning how to be a lady but instead is riding horses and wielding swords; and Tom, an orphan slave, who serves as shepherd to an abusive farmer. They live in Moorvale, a village akin to one you might find in the medieval times. It’s all very primeval and gothic. Mysterious things have been happening: lost animals, missing children, and whispers of an old terrifying tale more suppressed than forgotten. You see, the town of Moorvale owes its existence to three heroes: Tristan, the greatest knight that ever lived; Vithric, the greatest wizard that ever… Read more »

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Adult Book Recs for YA Readers

Adult Book Recs for YA Readers

  Do you ever get tired of reading young adult literature? Haha! Just kidding, that was obviously a joke. Sometimes it’s just nice to switch it up a bit, so this month, we’re recommending adult books that are an easy transition for YA readers. We’ve taken several YA books and have done our best to pair them up with similarly styled or themed “more mature” novels written for adult audiences. If you haven’t or don’t often read adult novels, this is a great introduction. And if you do but have been left uninspired (hence your obvious pursuit of refuge in YA), perhaps there may be a couple of titles here you’d like to try out. This is a list of some of our favorite adult books that we think YA readers will thoroughly enjoy. Without further ado… ~K.   K.’s Adult Recs   Notes from K.: My adult recommendations are… Read more »

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The Impossible Knife of Memory: review

The Impossible Knife of Memory: review

I understand now why Laurie Halse Anderson is one of those writers readers never fail to keep track off. I read Speak several years ago and remember feeling how it stood stark naked amongst other books I had read before it. Anderson’s writing is poetic yet so daringly outspoken that you can’t help but stop and listen. Anderson is famous (or infamous) for tackling varying degrees of heavy subjects. This may be her most ambitiously profound yet. It’s about Hayley Kincain. Daughter of Andy Kincain. Step-daughter of Trish. Homeschool-ed, truck-driving, cross-country traveling, socially-inept yet bad ass Hayley Kincain. Hayley enters her senior year in an actual school for the first time in her life. She and her father move into his childhood home, where she spent her early years living with Gramma. After her death, Hayley spent the next years criss-crossing the country as map navigator to her truck-driving father…. Read more »

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Literary Swoon: Our Fictional Crushes!

Literary Swoon: Our Fictional Crushes!

Alright, can we all just gather round, we’re about to have a very serious conversation. Leading men of YA have made us laugh, cry, swoon, drool, hate the utter unfairness of reality. Some of us like bad boys, some good boys, some a healthy mix of both. Some of us like them damaged, some like them adorably innocent. Many of them out there are cliches. They smile from the corner of their lips because they don’t know how to smile properly. But sometimes, some of them are done just right. This year’s Literary Swoon is Favorite Fictional Crushes. We are here today to thoroughly discuss the shiz out of this topic. Yesterday’s post featured some of our favorite authors and their crushes. Today, it is our turn. So sit back and relax. And most definitely enjoy. ~ K.   K.’s Fictional Crushes Jonah Griggs from Jellicoe Road Kartik from the Gemma… Read more »

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A Mad, Wicked Folly: review

A Mad, Wicked Folly: review

I’m sure you’ve seen this cover making its round in the book community. Even I find it quite catching, and I’ve been known to criticize a YA cover once or twice…or most-times. But that’s beside the point. What I want to say is that I think Sharon Biggs Waller’s A Mad, Wicked Folly deserves popularity. Because, truly, if one’s decision whether or not to read a book is based on synopsis alone this book would’ve been discarded easily. The premise promises drama and opulence to some, monotony and exasperation to others. It promises nothing more than what we’ve all read before: a girl trying to defy her circumstances, a girl with morals, goals, and personality. But they’re always a let down. Not here. Not Victoria Darling. Not Sharon Biggs Waller. A Mad, Wicked Folly is a historical young adult fiction that does its job; it entertains while imparting knowledge. Victoria… Read more »

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Neverwas Tour Stop + Giveaway

Neverwas Tour Stop + Giveaway

                Neverwas is truly a family affair. Not only is it a story about family but it is also written by one. Kelly Moore began writing Amber House a long time ago but finding no true inspiration, she locked it away. Twenty years later, her daughters Tucker and Larkin found the manuscripts and together they built the tale we now all read. This series is more than just a gothic young adult novel. It is more than just a paranormal, a romance, a mystery. It’s about family love, family grief and resentment, family dysfunctionalities, family history. It also deals with sexual and racial discrimination, and offers a sweet, touching glimpse into caring for someone with autism. Read below the very personal and sentimental explanations behind some of the issues brought up in Neverwas. Learn more about the story and the voices behind it…. Read more »

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