Posts Categorized: guest post

Forbidden Love in The Winner’s Curse: guest post + giveaway

Forbidden Love in The Winner’s Curse: guest post + giveaway

  When we invite an author to do a guest post for The Midnight Garden, the truth is that we never know what we’re going to get. I was thrilled when Marie Rutkoski’s piece came through for the official blog tour, however–I asked if she would talk to us about forbidden love, since Kestrel and Arin have to overcome a great many obstacles in The Winner’s Curse. This turned into something of an impromptu Q & A from the prompts I sent, and the thoughtfulness of her answers reaffirmed absolutely everything I loved about the book. It doesn’t hurt that she also mentions several of my favorite books in this post, too! If you’re a romantic, I daresay you’ll want a copy of this book straight away after reading this post. ~ Wendy   Why do we find forbidden love appealing? Marie Rutkoski: You must choose: 1. Your very favorite… Read more »

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Sexual Identity in Grasshopper Jungle: guest post + giveaway

Sexual Identity in Grasshopper Jungle: guest post + giveaway

Grasshopper Jungle is described as a “sci-fright journey of survival, sex, and the complex realities of the human condition,” and that fits this bizarre, fascinating book to perfection. The end of the world is nearing thanks to gigantic praying mantises, and while Austin is trying to figure out how the hell he’s supposed to stop them, he’s also wrestling with his feelings for both his girlfriend Shann and for his best friend Robby. The book is extremely well-written and crafted, and while the narration or content may be jarring to some readers with its frank fixation on male horniness that both serves and sometimes threatens to consume the plot, it definitely kept me interested and I think it’s a book that’s going to spark a lot of conversation. Certainly most of the early reactions have been extremely enthusiastic, and I am always in favor of YA books that explore topics… Read more »

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The Science Behind THE LOST PLANET: guest post + giveaway

The Science Behind THE LOST PLANET: guest post + giveaway

  The Lost Planet by Rachel Searles is a such fun middle grade sci-fi adventure! This story is action-packed, with great world-building and interesting characters, and I sped through the book in a matter of hours. I appreciated that the novel is age-appropriate, but the language isn’t dumbed down at all, and it’s a book that’s easily enjoyed by adults and older readers as well. The science and action are also awesome. The author is married to a rocket scientist, so when the opportunity for a guest post came up, I immediately asked if she would share her science research for the book with us. I knew that this must have informed the story and YOU-ARE-THERE feeling in a major way, so I’m very excited to hear what she has to say. Please join us in welcoming the author to the blog! ~ Wendy   Science fiction spans a wide… Read more »

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These Broken Stars Tour Kickoff + giveaway: World-building for the Future

These Broken Stars Tour Kickoff + giveaway: World-building for the Future

Welcome to the official kickoff for the These Broken Stars tour! Our readers know we only host tours for books and authors we are crazy about, and I can tell you that in this case we love both the book (here is Kate’s adoring review) and the authors. I met Amie in person when I was in Australia a year ago, where we bonded over our mutual love of YA scifi and other bookish discussions. Now here’s the thing: I rarely seek out real-life author interactions, particularly before I’ve read the book, because it’s inevitably awkward if I don’t end up liking it. BUT I LOVED IT, you guys. Lilac is that girl you wish you could travel with, because she’s independent and interesting and could fix your spaceship if it’s hit by an asteroid. (Well, maybe not an asteroid, but you know.) And TARVER. Tarver is one of the… Read more »

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Sex & Violence tour stop + giveaway

Sex & Violence tour stop + giveaway

Sex & Violence is one of the strongest debuts of the year. This powerful contemporary novel deals with 17-year-old Evan’s painful recovery from a traumatic event, as well as his struggles to overcome his crippling sense of guilt, post-traumatic stress disorder, and grief. Evan isn’t your typical YA protagonist, and in fact he’s a pretty unlikeable character when we first meet him. He’s an arrogant, hormonally-driven boy who makes no bones about his lack of interest in developing relationships with the girls he’s sleeping with, and yet the author manages to make us connect with him in a natural and intrinsic way before we’ve even begun to understand him. Evan’s narrative voice is raw, real, and touched with occasional humor, and I appreciated how well-developed the characters were. The story portrays teen sexuality, both male and female, in a realistic and varied way, and it’s particularly interesting to see the… Read more »

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Mira Grant Recommends YA + Parasite giveaway!

Mira Grant Recommends YA + Parasite giveaway!

Mira Grant, aka Seanan McGuire, is one of the few authors that I would probably run away from crying if I saw her at an event. Her Newsflesh books mean so much to me, and just last week as I was telling Christina about the series, I started to tear up just thinking about the powerful gut punch that it delivers. One of the things I appreciate about both Newsflesh and her newest book Parasite is that although they’re adult fiction, the voice is very youthful and humorous, and there’s both an energetic quality to the plots and an immediacy of emotion that make them perfect crossover titles for YA readers.  So after an excitable Twitter conversation, I thought it’d be fun to ask Mira if she’d write a guest post for us on YA books she loves. Her books are so intelligent and well-plotted that I was curious about… Read more »

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Fiona Wood on Girls, Sex, and Wildlife

Fiona Wood on Girls, Sex, and Wildlife

I don’t know about you, but I feel as though a vast majority of YA seems to portray teenagers as hypersmart, sophisticated creatures who are borderline perfect, or “carefully flawed” in exactly the right and tolerable way. As fun as that fiction can be, I always feel a certain amusement for characters like that, because how many of us actually were that spectacular at that age? I think part of the appeal of contemporary Aussie YA for me is that it consistently offers teenagers who act like teenagers; whether they’re snarly and vindictive or fumbly and sweet, a lot of them just seem very real. That’s certainly the case with the students in Wildlife by Fiona Wood. Sybilla and Lou are spending one school term doing an outdoor education program, where they find that surviving the wilderness is easy in comparison to surviving deceptive friends, tricky, needy boys, and their own… Read more »

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