Posts Categorized: fantasy

Days of Blood and Starlight; review

Days of Blood and Starlight; review

Days of Blood and Starlight may well have been my most anticipated release this year. I was captivated by the lush and layered world Laini Taylor built in its predecessor, Daughter of Smoke and Bone, and rendered absolutely in love with both Karou and Akiva. The thrill of the tension in their discovery of one another, the sweet ache of their romance as it unfolded, and the crush of sorrow for them both at the end stayed with me the many months I waited for the release of its sequel. So, to say I had high hopes is an understatement. I couldn’t wait to dive back into Karou and Akiva’s world, and see just how they would mend the rift between them–BECAUSE THEY HAVE TO MEND IT, RIGHT?–and save their world together. What I got was nothing close to what I expected, but everything the sequel to Daughter of Smoke… Read more »

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The Shadow Society: review

The Shadow Society: review

The Shadow Societyby Marie Rutkoski Three words sum up my overall experience with The Shadow Society: I don’t know. I didn’t know what I was reading and I still am not quite sure. I do know that I didn’t like it very much. The plot was uninteresting, the world building was lacking, and the characters were mediocre. It’s about Darcy, a foster child of many, always being returned to the system, always needing a place to belong. Finally she’s found a place where she has a home, a school, and friends. The mystery to her is her past — she is missing the first five years of her life. Intriguing, non? Well, not really. As a character, Darcy was kind of undetermined for me. She had no solid personality with which I could identify her. I didn’t know if she was the sweet, vulnerable, sensitive type. Or the badass, take-no-crap… Read more »

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The Raven Boys: review & giveaway

The Raven Boys: review & giveaway

The Raven Boysby Maggie Stiefvater On a cold night every spring, sixteen-year-old Blue and her psychic mother wait in a churchyard for the dead to arrive. Her mother is usually the one who sees the spirits of people who will die within the next twelve months, but this year, Blue herself is startled by the sad, desperate sight of a boy named Gansey falling to his knees before her. “There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve, Blue. Either you’re his true love…or you killed him.” With those chilling words, Blue is caught up in a mystery she never expected involving the privileged Raven Boys from Aglionby Academy. She must guard her heart closely, however, because Blue’s always been told that she’s destined to kill her true love with a kiss. If Edgar Allan Poe had taught the boys of Dead Poets Society,… Read more »

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Unspoken: review

Unspoken: review

Unspokenby Sarah Rees Brennan Sarah Rees Brennan’s Unspoken is unequivocally one of the best young adult books I’ve ever read. I don’t even know where to begin. Is it enough to tell you to read it? Synopsis aside, this is as colourful, as unique, as moving and absorbing as a book can get. The plot involves a strange family, a old-town legend, murder, love and magic. Brennan envisions an original premise that holds your attention from the very first page. Her idea is fully developed, never giving too much while holding nothing back; the details rather come as they may. The pace is a leisure walk through Kami’s everyday life, with curious bursts of the real mystery surrounding the return of the infamous Lynburn family, feared and revered as local gods. It is arguably slow, but readers are not left impatient because Brennan never fails to deliver quality. The air… Read more »

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Seraphina: review

Seraphina: review

Seraphina by Rachel Hartman “He released the last chord like a boulder off a trebuchet.” It always feels this way when ending a book. There’s a weight to the final words, then you let them go and they’re gone. I don’t think I’ve read a young adult book quite like Seraphina before. Rachel Hartman has built for us a world so rich and unique that it is almost dizzying to walk into. Her world is swathed in dark colours depicting a tale of menacing dragons who advocate peace, a stiff but admirably stalwart royal family of Queens and princesses, mothers persecuted, abandoned children, a gang of grotesques, a population of almost-dragons living like scum on the outskirts of humanity, exiled knights, music, love, war, betrayal, identity, lies and truths, a people divided between acceptance and hostility towards the winged-beasts, and finally, those caught in between. The story sweeps you off… Read more »

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Crown of Embers ARC prize pack!

Crown of Embers ARC prize pack!

If you’re a fan of romantic fantasy and adventure, you’ve probably already seen all the rave reviews for Rae Carson’s Girl of Fire and Thorns. We’re excited to offer you the chance to win a hardback of the first book as well as an ARC of the highly anticipated sequel Crown of Embers! The sequel won’t even be out until September 18, 2012, but here’s your opportunity to get your hands on a copy before it’s available for sale. Crown of Embers Synopsis: In the sequel to the acclaimed The Girl of Fire and Thorns, a seventeen-year-old princess turned war queen faces sorcery, adventure, untold power, and romance as she fulfills her epic destiny. With a one-eyed warrior, a loyal friend, an enemy defector, and the man she is falling in love with, Elisa crosses the ocean in search of the perilous, uncharted, and mythical source of the Godstone’s power. That… Read more »

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Shadow and Bone: review

Shadow and Bone: review

Shadow and Boneby Leigh Bardugo The correct term for my current condition is Tskdn;ieajnrja. It is a state in which the mind of a reader of young adult fiction is awesomely blown. I’ve lost all sense of decorum. You see, all I want to do is fangirl. That’s it. All the time. I come near the book and it’s a reaction — I just squeal and squeeze my hands to my heart and bat my lashes and swing side to side, breathe in air, breathe out wishful thoughts.  It’s a symptom, a side effect, a sickness, a who cares. I don’t mind that Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone has turned my brain to mush, or that it has limited my mental capacity to that of a tween girl. I’ve written notes and I have things to say, I just can’t piece them together to make enough sense that they would… Read more »

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