Posts Categorized: faeries

Sorcerer to the Crown: Review

Sorcerer to the Crown: Review

In many ways, this book was such a perfect Christmas-time read. It is a Regency-era British historical fantasy that delights in the magic employed within its pages, and the utter charm of its characters and its world. The writing is also a treat; completely in the style of a book that had been written in the Regency era, it more than does its job in conveying the reader so completely to the world on its pages. When you want a book that’s going to wholly transport you, this is the sort you reach for. In the world of Sorcerer to the Crown, Britain’s supply of magic has been on the decline for years. The flow of magic from Fairyland into the mortal realm has all but stopped, as have the presence of familiars, the spirits/vessels of magic needed to make a mere magician into a sorcerer. This being Regency Britain,… Read more »

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A History of Glitter and Blood: Review

A History of Glitter and Blood: Review

I’m not entirely sure how I feel about Hannah Moskowitz’s new book, A History of Glitter and Blood. It is a really weird book, you all, and I don’t mean that in a bad way. It was not entirely to my liking and I still can’t stop thinking about it?  Books about fairies are not my thing, and thinking about unreliable narrators reminds me of how much I disliked We Were Liars, but hey, I picked this one up because the cover was pretty and Moskowitz writes queer-centric fiction. If you like weird books and fairies and unreliable narrators and thinking about how history’s written, you’ll probably like this, though. I suspect it’ll be a polarizing read. Why is it weird? Well. There are fairies. Who are covered in glitter. And gnomes who eat fairies, despite disliking the taste of glitter. (And most fairies are missing some body parts as a result…. Read more »

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A Court of Thorns and Roses: Review

A Court of Thorns and Roses: Review

In the deepest winter forest an arrow is shot in desperation. The quarrel finds its target, but the consequences are far reaching and unexpected. Feyre, youngest daughter of an impoverished nobleman, has unintentionally killed one of the Fae and broken the treaty between humans and Fae. Now she must trade her life for that of her slain foe. Caught between death or handing herself over to live in the lands of the Fae, never to return to her family, Feyre surrenders. This is a totally new fantasy world, completely separate from that of Throne of Glass. Feyre lives on an island resembling Great Britain that is divided among human ruled lands and the realms of the Fae (many blessings upon Bloomsbury for including a map for those of us “constant flippers”). The humans live in constant fear of the Fae, and the Fae live in constant fear of the ever… Read more »

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The Darkest Part of the Forest: Review

The Darkest Part of the Forest: Review

This book. I love this book. That is the review. That is all. But, really. I was fairly sure I would love this book going in just because it was by Holly Black and it was about faeries. Holly Black will always hold a special place in my heart because Tithe was one of the first YA books I got really, really into. It was the first book I read that had girls who weren’t always (or even often) likable, gay characters, and faeries that were actually like, well, faeries. Her faerie books ruined me for all other faerie books because they were so perfect and dark and good. The Darkest Part of the Forest did not disappoint. It was all the best parts of her writing—dark, beautiful world-building straight out of a fairytale, interesting and flawed characters, and a plot that blended the magical and the reality perfectly. It… Read more »

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The Falconer: Review Discussion

The Falconer: Review Discussion

  Being the fantasy loving gals that we are, Kate and I both devoured this one last month. And now here we are to bring our thoughts to you! I’m not normally a huge fan of steampunk or faery stories, but Kate likes both. We ended up enjoying this one just the same, though. Intriguing! Do join us as we discuss the reasons why.     Kim: I rather enjoyed this one. I don’t often go for steampunk, and I really don’t care for faery stories so the fact that I liked this as much as I did should go to show for something. I mean, there are mechanical spiders that will stitch you up. That’s fucking awesome. Kate: I tend to like steampunk as a general rule–not, like, the cosplay or whatever, because it seems exhausting, but I love being able to read historically-set novels that can contain modern… Read more »

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All that Glows: review

All that Glows: review

I’ll admit that I am partially to blame for what happened here. I read the premise, and I thought this would be a reverse Jane Eyre–or at the very least a reverse Twilight–with, you know, like a billion-year-old lady who falls in love with a teenage boy. I thought the power dynamics would be knocked on their tiny heads. I thought this bad-ass Fae warrior would have to make some tough choices about a humble soldier’s worthiness as a match for a prince. Basically I wanted She-Hector. And that’s all on me. Totally, no sarcasm, my fault. I know that the thing I wanted can’t really work in a young adult romance novel. I get it. Young women tend to be more mature than young men, so the popular fantasy is of an older dude (who doesn’t look creepily older). It really is super appealing. And your audience (teenage girls)… Read more »

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Darkest Mercy: review

Darkest Mercy: review

Darkest Mercy by Melissa Marr The Wicked Lovely series by Melissa Marr sets up the intriguing premise of a girl who discovers a fey world hidden in the ordinary world around her. As the books progress, the mortal girl Aislynn falls in love with Seth, her mortal boyfriend; she pledges to rule the faeries as Summer Queen with Keenan, the tragic Summer King; and then she has a hard time choosing between her destiny and her heart. Along the way there are long and tedious side trips with other characters who play roles with varying degrees of importance in the overall structure of the fey world. The books are very popular, which might be due in part to gorgeous covers and a love triangle which includes an attentive, pierced and tattooed boyfriend. Is it really a triangle, though, when one party really is just trying to do his duty?  Darkest… Read more »

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