Posts Categorized: dystopian/post-apocalyptic

Blackout (Newsflesh #3): review

Blackout (Newsflesh #3): review

Blackout (Newsflesh #3)by Mira Grant This review is spoiler-free, and safe even for those who haven’t read the first two books in the series. Forget everything you ever assumed about science fiction novels or zombie thrillers: the Newsflesh trilogy defies all expectations. The story that began with a turbulent political campaign in a post-apocalyptic Feed escalates here as the blogger journalists from After the End of Times continue their quest to uncover the truth behind the deadly Kellis-Amberlee virus that has decimated civilization–one that is now mutating and spreading faster than ever before. The breakneck action and intrigue in Blackout is intense as a dangerous rescue mission, disease-carrying mosquitoes, zombie bears, tangled family drama, and a mysterious patient known as Subject 7B all complicate what is already hell on earth. It’s funny that my favorite zombie series actually has the least amount of zombie action in it, but Newsflesh hasn’t… Read more »

Divider

Above: review

Above: review

Above by Leah Bobet Above is a deeply human tale. Bobet takes human problems, human hates, human sadnesses and disappointments, and human hopes, and wraps them up in a jarringly sparse, backwards prose about an underground community of Freaks, who wish for nothing more than to be left alone.   Above is a challenge, evidenced by the numerous reviewers who’ve abandoned ship before they ever set sail. Which is a shame. Because while this may be categorized under paranormal and science fiction, it’s really no more than a disguise. Bobet’s story hits much closer to home than might be expected. The prose. It is the gift and curse. The dialect is disordered and requires deciphering. Basic rules of grammar does not apply here. Our protagonist, Matthew, is a young man born underground, in Safe. A Freak-built safe-house for those who have gills, lion’s feet, and crab claws; for those who… Read more »

Divider

Masque of the Red Death: review

Masque of the Red Death: review

Masque of the Red Death by Bethany Griffin Ah, steampunk libertines! Who’d have thought they’d be so appealing? Books that are heavily influenced by classic stories are always tricky, particularly when it’s as ambitious an undertaking as a story inspired by the Edgar Allan Poe classic. I loved the lavish setting and moodiness of the original story, so I had my doubts that anything could come close to capturing its crazy vibe. But somehow Bethany Griffin has managed to create a very similarly dark, extravagant feeling in her gothic adaptation, which is a surprisingly compelling read. Seventeen-year-old Araby Worth lives in a world devastated by plague. Haunted by the death of her twin brother Finn, she and her friend April spend their nights attending opulent club parties, trying to lose themselves in pleasure so they can forget the what’s going on around them. In this atmosphere of dissipation and discontent,… Read more »

Divider

review: Partials

review: Partials

Partialsby Dan Wells It seems as though YA Science Fiction is experiencing a bit of a resurgence lately. Like many other readers, I’m a little tired of the barely-dystopian trend, so it’s great to see a very firmly science-oriented book like Partialscome along. Airborne viruses + survivalist action drama + human interest story is a great combination, and one I think most fans of post-apocalyptic thrillers will enjoy. In the year 2076, 11 years after an airborne viral outbreak, the average newborn lives just 56 hours. 16-year-old Kira Walker, a young medic interning at a hospital, thinks that the key to human survival lies in studying Partials, a group of rogue cyborgs described as “unthinking, unfeeling human killers.” Since Partials released the virus to begin with, surely they have the answers to a cure–whether it’s through their genetic makeup or through their knowledge. When her friend Madison gets pregnant, Kira… Read more »

Divider

Article 5: review

Article 5: review

Article 5 by Kristen Simmons “Dystomance” doesn’t appear to be going anywhere soon, and the appetite for YA romance playing out against a backdrop of government oppression remains healthy, judging by the titles storming my goodreads feed. I’ve had varying degrees of success with this particular subgenre, and I’ve come to the conclusion that I prefer those where the romance takes a back seat to the plot and worldbuilding. It’s a personal preference, but I find that the opposite scenario, with the romance centre stage and the world set up to fuel romantic angst, makes for less of a satisfying reading experience. So while I approached Article 5 with some trepidation, and I would still shelve it along with its apocalyptic and dystopian romance companions, I was pleasantly surprised to find that I liked this book. I don’t love it and it’s not without issues, primarily of the worldbuilding variety,… Read more »

Divider

review: The Selection

review: The Selection

The Selectionby Kiera Cass Reaction before reading this book: I know I may be a sucker for falling for this cover, but look at it! I totally want to go to that party. Reaction after reading this book:  I no longer want to go to this party. Full disclosure:  I did not read this entire book. I took notes for the first 88 pages, read to page 168, and then skimmed the rest. I think reading more than half the book qualifies as giving it a fair shot. The Selection arrives with a gorgeous cover and interesting premise. What if a lottery allowed 35 teenage girls to compete for the hand of a handsome prince? I thought this might be a fun and fluffy read, so I pushed aside my initial misgivings about the names and pounced on the chance to read the ARC. Turns out, sometimes your gut is… Read more »

Divider

Angelfall: review

Angelfall: review

Angelfallby Susan Ee In the beginning, it starts with a single feather drifting slowly down from the sky. When 17-year-old Penryn sees this simple sight, she is filled with incredible dread, because this lovely, floating ephemeral thing is an unlikely sign of terrible things to come. Six weeks after a devastating attack on earth, the world has been torn apart by a war between angels and humans. Caught up in a battle she doesn’t understand, Penryn watches in horror as an angel named Raffe is cornered and brutally stripped of his wings. In trying to help, she antagonizes one of the perpetrators and is forced to watch as her wheelchair-bound little sister is taken away. Penryn angrily demands that Raffe provides information and assistance in finding her sibling, and the two natural enemies must work together to outwit danger at every turn. If you’ve been searching high and low for… Read more »

Divider