Posts Categorized: dystopian/post-apocalyptic

The Glass Arrow: Review + Giveaway

The Glass Arrow: Review + Giveaway

Oh, The Glass Arrow. How desperately I coveted you. At NCTE/ALAN this year, along with A Court of Thorns and Roses, you were the book I was most excited to find, take home, and tuck away into my heart forever. But unfortunately, our love was not to be. Why was I even excited about The Glass Arrow in the first place? Ahem. It’s a dystopian novel about women’s reproductive rights and/or bodily autonomy being taken away! It features (in theory) a badass, bow-wielding protagonist! It was being compared to Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale! Augh, how could I not want to read that? If you like those things, you may also be tempted to pick this up (and don’t let my review stop you from doing so, buuuuuut). In practice, you should probably just read The Handmaid’s Tale (for the first time! or again!) instead. Here’s why. 1. I was disappointed in… Read more »

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The Queen of the Tearling: Review

The Queen of the Tearling: Review

Have you read The Queen of the Tearling yet? If not: stop what you are doing immediately; do not pass Go; do not collect $200. Just go read The Queen of the Tearling. You will not regret it. I’m really bummed that I didn’t read it sooner. (And didn’t read it soon enough to count it among my 2014 favorites, because it definitely is, you guys.) It’s the sort of novel I’m predisposed to like because it features all of the following: lost princesses, a kingdom in turmoil, a tiny bit of romance, and ladies being badasses. And the underlying message is “this is why books are important, you guys.” So, this is all to say: if you like any of all of these things, please go read The Queen of the Tearling, and then join me in biting my nails, squealing like a ten year-old, and making grabby hands for… Read more »

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Nice Dragons Finish Last: Review

Nice Dragons Finish Last: Review

  A soul sucking ghost cat. This book has one. I do like to hook you into reviews with mentions of mystical cats, don’t I? Well, besides the cat this is an incredibly enjoyable futuristic urban fantasy romp. Add in one seriously lovable protagonist and in the beginnings of what is sure to be one epically cute romance and what more could I need? Oh, that’s right. Dragons. In the America of the not too distant future, a meteor crash has reawakened magic for humans and unleashed dragons back into our world. I really loved that this is a futuristic urban fantasy with lots of cool sci fi touches and even a distinctly dystopian feel. In the newly created Detroit Free Zone, US law does not apply and dragons are expressly forbidden. Which makes it really a shame that our hero, Julius, a dragon, finds himself exiled to the DFZ… Read more »

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Station Eleven: Review

Station Eleven: Review

This is a fascinating story, a combination of post-apocalyptic genre fiction and literary fiction. A novel that is not so much concerned with the how of survival as it is with the why. It is a survival story but it is not survivalist. There are almost no heart pounding action scenes or encounters with the depraved dregs of humanity. There are big questions at hand. What does it mean to be alive when almost everyone else is dead? How do we go on when the world we knew is gone? How do you make a life in the graveyard of civilization? There is a certain horror element in how real the situation could be. A pandemic flu could come and wipe out humanity. There have been great plagues throughout history. In the age of air travel our world is more interconnected than ever. We will carry that virus farther and… Read more »

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Echoes of Us: guest post + giveaway

Echoes of Us: guest post + giveaway

Last year, Kat Zhang shared her journey to publication story with us, speaking to her experiences as a young author juggling school, writing, and the publishing industry. It seems fitting that with Echoes of Us, the last book in her dystopian Hybrid Chronicles releasing this month, Kat is back with us to talk about the series coming to an end, and how her life has changed because of it. After all, we as fans get emotional when favorite series come to an end, so it’s only natural that authors get sentimental, too! If you haven’t tried this series yet and you enjoy science fiction with a more introspective bent, you must pick this one up sometime. I’d recommend it to fans of thoughtful, character-driven books like The Lost Girl. Saying Goodbye to a Series by Kat Zhang It’s a cool thing to have books that release almost exactly one year… Read more »

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Patrick Ness giveaway

Patrick Ness giveaway

Sometimes you can read a single book by an author and it has such an impact that you know you’ll always check out the rest of his work, regardless of subject or style. That’s how I felt after sobbing my way through the poignant book A Monster Calls, and after reading his weirdly dreamy scifi novel More Than This, that feeling has only intensified. The latter is a terrific blend of I Am Legend + Twilight Zone + The Matrix, but tinged with a thoughtful, still moodiness that I really liked. It’s a bit of a cautionary tale re: technology, and I loved the story structure, characters, and writing. Young Thomasz has particularly great speech patterns and dialogue, and the story never feels cliche or boring–no small feat when the first 30% consists almost entirely of Seth on his own. It asks more questions than it answers, but then again,… Read more »

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The Girl with All the Gifts: review

The Girl with All the Gifts: review

This is the story of a girl, locked in a room, who is strapped into a chair every morning while a man holds a gun to her head. She’s wheeled into a classroom in which there are other kids strapped into chairs just like hers, where a woman teaches them lessons that they will probably never need to learn. The Girl with All the Gifts is difficult to review, because it’s one of those stories that’s best enjoyed if you know next to nothing about it. It isn’t necessarily difficult to figure out what’s going on, but the meticulously crafted narrative is a pleasure to experience every step of the way, particularly in the beginning chapters inside 10-year-old Melanie’s head, when the author allows the reader to put together pieces of a puzzle that Melanie herself doesn’t even know exists. It’s brilliant writing that pulls off the trick of a… Read more »

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