Posts Categorized: adult crossover

The Girl with All the Gifts: review

The Girl with All the Gifts: review

This is the story of a girl, locked in a room, who is strapped into a chair every morning while a man holds a gun to her head. She’s wheeled into a classroom in which there are other kids strapped into chairs just like hers, where a woman teaches them lessons that they will probably never need to learn. The Girl with All the Gifts is difficult to review, because it’s one of those stories that’s best enjoyed if you know next to nothing about it. It isn’t necessarily difficult to figure out what’s going on, but the meticulously crafted narrative is a pleasure to experience every step of the way, particularly in the beginning chapters inside 10-year-old Melanie’s head, when the author allows the reader to put together pieces of a puzzle that Melanie herself doesn’t even know exists. It’s brilliant writing that pulls off the trick of a… Read more »

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Heaven’s Queen: Review

Heaven’s Queen: Review

So here’s the deal: Heaven’s Queen is fine. If you enjoyed where the series seemed to be heading in book two, if you think Rupert and Devi are interesting together, if you don’t particularly care for the parts of the story where Devi fights in her robot suit… You’ll like this book. It will seem fitting and appropriate, you will be warm and happy, and you’ll agree with the majority of readers on Goodreads, where it currently has a rating over four stars. What follows will contain minor spoilers for the previous books in this series. If you started this series because you were interested in a story about a badass female mercenary who unapologetically sleeps around (you know, a man in every port and all that), and who fights in an awesome robot suit, you may come out of it feeling a little bit betrayed. Devi’s not a character… Read more »

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The Goblin Emperor: Review

The Goblin Emperor: Review

What an intriguing and refreshing surprise this book was! I was hoping I would find a story special and worthy enough to be reviewed on my birthday and I succeeded. Steampunk, feminist elves (and goblin) for the win! This is not a fast paced, action adventure fantasy. There is no strong magical aspect. Rather, it is a fascinating character study, a meditation on subtle court politics and intrigue, and an examination of the relationships that make it all worthwhile. Much like the intricate clockwork in the story, the book itself is one of many details and pieces, some interconnected, some working separately but contributing their own importance, and all ticking steadily on to bring us one truly complex and captivating tale. First off, I will say that there is some adjustment needed to the language used. At the back of the book is a guide to the pronunciations and naming… Read more »

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Honor’s Knight: review

Honor’s Knight: review

Wendy gave me Fortune’s Pawn for Christmas, and I put off reading it for months and months–until a week ago. I have a tendency to do this; being given or loaned a book makes me feel like there’s a lot of pressure on me to enjoy it, and that perceived pressure pretty quickly turns into a weird resentment of the book in question. I’m such an idiot. Once I finally sat down with the darned thing, I devoured it in one sitting, and as soon as I finished it around 2 am, I proceeded to read Honor’s Knight right then and there in a blurry haze of bloodshot eyes and coffee breath. Because these books are really, really good, you guys. What follows will contain spoilers for Fortune’s Pawn, the previous book in the Paradox series. Honor’s Knight opens with an intense, heartbreaking prologue in which we learn why so… Read more »

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Murder of Crows: review

Murder of Crows: review

The best sequels expand the world you know and make you fall even deeper in love with the characters, and Murder of Crows does all that and more in a story that’s just as interesting as its predecessor. Written in Red was one of my favorite books last year, so it is a relief to find that the sequel continues its winning combination of dark urban fantasy tinged with unexpected humor. This time around, a mysterious drug is causing trouble within the community, and Meg’s nightmares seem to signal impending danger for the terra indigene. The relationships between Meg and all the other characters are so well-written, particularly in her interactions and histories with other women. I also appreciate how sensitive everyone is to potential threats to her well-being, and as well as the sense of protectiveness towards women in general. Consent and choice are huge themes here, from something… Read more »

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