Posts By: Layla

Lies My Girlfriend Told Me: Review

Lies My Girlfriend Told Me: Review

Julie Anne Peters’s latest – and last, it seems – novel, Lies My Girlfriend Told Me really made me think about what I want from LGBTQ YA. (It also made me want to check out Julie Anne Peters’s book Luna, which Wendy has read and reviewed.) To begin: there are lots of things to like about this novel: it avoids the coming-out narrative and surrounding conflict that is common in LGBTQ YA; the queer protagonist isn’t destined to a life of solitude and unending misery; the prose is good (and there are moments of unexpected humor that really worked for me). I am really pleased about all these things – coming-out stories are important, but LGBTQ teens have other kinds of stories, too, and it’s nice to see those other stories getting some attention. Lies My Girlfriend Told Me is great in that respect; our protagonist Alix’s sexuality – or that of… Read more »

Divider

We Were Liars: Review

We Were Liars: Review

We Were Liars was not for me. Some folks will undoubtedly like it – and I picked it up because I started seeing recommendations for it everywhere – but it was almost a DNF for me (a rare feat for a book). I had to force myself to finish it.Here’s the premise: four teenagers whose respective families call them “The Liars.” They spend their summers together on a private island and are mostly white and upper-crusty (with the exception of Gat, and we will get to him later). They have lots of money and lots of problems (mostly caused by too much money and crazy awful parenting). Our narrator, Cadence Sinclair Eastman, says of her family: “We are Sinclairs. No one is needy. No one is wrong.” This gives you a decent idea of the family’s prevailing philosophy: Sinclairs are beautiful and perfect and wealthy and super invested in being beautiful and perfect and… Read more »

Divider

If You Could Be Mine: Review

If You Could Be Mine: Review

I should start by saying that I’m glad that this book exists. There aren’t enough young adult novels that deal with LGBTQ subjects, and there certainly aren’t enough that deal with those subjects in the Middle East (or anywhere that isn’t contemporary America, to be honest). Sara Farizan’s If You Could Be Mine – about a same-sex relationship between two Iranian teenagers – goes a long way towards filling the gap. I wish books like this had existed while I was growing up. That said, however, I really wanted more from this novel. Here’s the premise: Sahar and her best friend, Nasrin, have been in love since they were children. In addition to this, Nasrin’s family functions as Sahar’s adoptive family: Sahar’s mother died when she was young, and her grieving father, though physically present, has pretty much been an absentee parent ever since. So, on top of loving Nasrin,… Read more »

Divider