Top Ten Tuesday (10): Top Ten Characters Who Are Fellow Book Nerds

Top Ten Tuesday (10): Top Ten Characters Who Are Fellow Book Nerds

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. This week, the theme is “Top Ten Characters Who Are Fellow Book Nerds” and we’re happy to be participating!     For this week’s Top Ten Tuesday, Jamie explains that “book nerds” can include a variety of things – people who work at bookstores! people who are aspiring writers! – so I’m also working with this broader definition for my list today. 1. Jane Eyre from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë: One of my all-time favorite novels! As you might remember, the book opens with Jane trying to read Bewick’s History of British Birds stealthily in the windowseat and getting caught at it by her awful cousin John Reed. 2. Catherine Morland from Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen: Catherine’s love for Gothic novels – particularly Ann Radcliffe’s – causes her to suspect that Northanger Abbey holds deep dark secrets at every turn…. Read more »

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Lies We Tell Ourselves: Review

Lies We Tell Ourselves: Review

Hey hey, guess what I just read? Lies We Tell Ourselves! A really great book that came out last year that I should have read immediately upon its release! Why? Because it’s an interracial lesbian romance set in the South during the desegregation of Virginia’s public school system. (You had me at lesbian romance.) Anyway, while it is not without its problems, Robin Talley’s Lies We Tell Ourselves is a really strong debut novel. I read it in one sitting, and it is a testament to the book’s excellence that I really enjoyed it despite having to endure a massive airport delay. (I wasn’t even bothered! I just wanted to sit down again so I could keep. reading. the book.) I wanted to review it because (1) if you haven’t read it, you should read it and (2) man, I have all the feelings about this one, and I want to… Read more »

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Top Ten Tuesday (9): Ten Books That Celebrate Diversity

Top Ten Tuesday (9): Ten Books That Celebrate Diversity

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. This week, the theme is “Ten Books That Celebrate Diversity” and we’re happy to be participating!         The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa I am so fond of this dystopian vampire trilogy. I’m especially fond of the second book which is just a thing of gory, action packed, ass kicking POC heroine, romantic glory. You know, it’s basically all of the things I love best. Alison + katana + vampiric badassery=everything you need. Eon by Alison Goodman Eon is a fantasy duology of magic, mysticism, and dragons in a blend of Japanese and Chinese astrology. Plus, there’s also the cross dressing element as Eon is really Eona, a girl hiding in plain sight as a boy since everyone just knows that a girl could never be a Dragoneye. Obviously. Runaways by Brian K. Vaughn I love this… Read more »

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Pretending to Be Erica: Guest Post + Giveaway

Pretending to Be Erica: Guest Post + Giveaway

I’ve said this is the year of the cute contemporary in YA…but it’s also the year of another important genre, the YA thriller! I’ve read a lot of thrillers, and for some reason it’s not often that I find YA ones that keep me engaged. But this year there have been some really terrific suspense novels for teens, including this sure-footed debut. Pretending to Be Erica is about a girl who’s seen it all, done it all, and is planning on conning everyone around her. You see how she’s been raised since childhood to deceive and swindle, you see how she’s calculating the best way to take advantage of someone else’s misfortune and suffering. And yet because the narrative voice is so terrific, and because the plot is so surprisingly plausible for the most part and well-executed, you’re invested in her story. I enjoyed this one from start to finish,… Read more »

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Review: Goodbye Stranger

Review: Goodbye Stranger

Goodbye Stranger affectingly and realistically tells the intertwining stories of three young teenagers navigating the confusing and tumultuous time of early adolescence. Bridge, an accident survivor is looking for meaning on why she’s still here. Sherm is dealing with the aftershock of a family betrayal. And an unnamed 9th grader (written in a surprisingly effective second person) is grappling with a potentially friendship-ending mistake. The story is about how life gets so suddenly and shockingly complicated in middle school. And it is about how teens deal with the newness, rawness, and intensity of their emotions. Best friends can suddenly betray. A beloved grandparent can walk out on his family. A boy can text you asking for “a picture ;)” but what does it mean? Throughout reading this book I couldn’t help pausing repeatedly to think, “Man, it is so stressful to be a teenager.” The narrative seamlessly intertwines to show… Read more »

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Top Ten Tuesday (8): Last Ten Books That Came Into My Possession

Top Ten Tuesday (8): Last Ten Books That Came Into My Possession

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. This week, the theme is “Last Ten Books That Came Into My Possession” and we’re happy to be participating!     1. Trixie Belden and the Secret of the Mansion by Julie Campbell We’re reading this for our TMG Readalong this month! It’s the first Trixie Belden mystery and apparently the opening line is something like, “Oh, Moms, I’ll just die if I don’t have a horse!” So I’m pretty excited to start this one, thanks to my local library. I’m in Florida visiting family right now and this book has joined me. (My mother read Trixie Belden during her childhood and was excited, too!) 2. Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier I’ve never read anything by Juliet Marillier before and stumbled upon The Daughter of the Forest at my local library. Since I’d been meaning to… Read more »

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A History of Glitter and Blood: Review

A History of Glitter and Blood: Review

I’m not entirely sure how I feel about Hannah Moskowitz’s new book, A History of Glitter and Blood. It is a really weird book, you all, and I don’t mean that in a bad way. It was not entirely to my liking and I still can’t stop thinking about it?  Books about fairies are not my thing, and thinking about unreliable narrators reminds me of how much I disliked We Were Liars, but hey, I picked this one up because the cover was pretty and Moskowitz writes queer-centric fiction. If you like weird books and fairies and unreliable narrators and thinking about how history’s written, you’ll probably like this, though. I suspect it’ll be a polarizing read. Why is it weird? Well. There are fairies. Who are covered in glitter. And gnomes who eat fairies, despite disliking the taste of glitter. (And most fairies are missing some body parts as a result…. Read more »

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